in

The Wilmington Coup of November 10, 1898 When White Supremacists Overthrew The Government

Examining the Tragic Events and Lasting Impact of the Wilmington Coup

Race Riots in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1898 (Photo by Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images)

On November 10, 1898, the city of Wilmington, North Carolina, became the backdrop for a sinister and calculated assault on democracy known as the Wilmington Coup. This dark chapter in American history serves as a stark reminder of the deeply entrenched racism and political suppression that plagued the post-Reconstruction era.

Employees of Alexander Sprunt & Son. The records of the Cape Fear Museum identify them as: Back Row (l to r): Mr. Sykes, James Smith, Russel ____; Front Row (l to r): Jim ____, Tom Payne, Tom Brown. Photo courtesy of the Cape Fear Museum, Wilmington, North Carolina.
Employees of Alexander Sprunt & Son. The records of the Cape Fear Museum identify them as: Back Row (l to r): Mr. Sykes, James Smith, Russel ____; Front Row (l to r): Jim ____, Tom Payne, Tom Brown. Photo courtesy of the Cape Fear Museum, Wilmington, North Carolina.

In the years following the Civil War, Wilmington had become a hub of African American political and economic success. The city boasted a thriving Black middle class, a vibrant press, and a significant African American voting population. However, the progressive social fabric of Wilmington was perceived as a threat by white supremacists seeking to maintain their grip on power.

Led by prominent figures like Alfred Waddell, a former Confederate officer, and other white supremacist leaders, a conspiracy was hatched to dismantle the progressive political structure and instill fear in the hearts of African Americans. Employing a toxic blend of racial hatred, propaganda, and violence, the conspirators executed their plan with meticulous precision.

Image Not Found
Confederate officer, Alfred Waddell

On that fateful day, armed white mobs, comprised of Ku Klux Klan members and other supporters, descended upon the city with a singular objective: to forcibly remove the elected government officials, including the newly elected biracial city council, and suppress the African American community’s political power.

The Wilmington Coup of November 10, 1898 When White Supremacists Overthrew The Government

Amidst a climate of fear and intimidation, the mob rampaged through the streets of Wilmington, torching homes, businesses, and the press offices of African American-owned newspapers. The violence was aimed not only at physical destruction but also at eradicating any semblance of Black political autonomy and silencing dissenting voices.

The coup resulted in the deaths of an estimated 60 to 300 African Americans, while countless others were forced to flee for their lives. Elected officials were driven out of office, and the city’s progressive political structure was dismantled, paving the way for an era of segregation, disenfranchisement, and institutionalized racism.

The Wilmington Coup of November 10, 1898 When White Supremacists Overthrew The Government

The repercussions of the Wilmington Coup reverberated far beyond the city’s borders. The successful implementation of this coup d’état sent shockwaves throughout the nation, exposing the fragility of democracy and the depth of racial animosity that still permeated American society. The events in Wilmington served as a chilling warning of the lengths to which white supremacists would go to maintain their grip on power and suppress the rights and aspirations of African Americans.

The aftermath of the coup saw a wave of disfranchisement laws and Jim Crow segregation policies implemented across the South, further entrenching racial inequality and suppressing the political agency of African Americans for decades to come. The trauma inflicted on the residents of Wilmington reverberated through generations, leaving an enduring scar on the collective memory of the African American community.

John Edward Taylor, c. 1898. John E. Taylor was a prominent businessman and civil servant in Wilmington. He owned a thriving real estate business and a shoe store in Wilmington.
John Edward Taylor, c. 1898. John E. Taylor was a prominent businessman and civil servant in Wilmington. He owned a thriving real estate business and a shoe store in Wilmington.

It is crucial to remember the Wilmington Coup as a stark reminder of the ongoing struggle for racial justice and equality in the United States. The courage and resilience of the Wilmington community, in the face of unspeakable violence and oppression, laid the groundwork for future civil rights movements and the eventual dismantling of segregationist policies.

As we reflect on the Wilmington Coup, let it serve as a solemn reminder of the importance of safeguarding democracy, upholding the principles of equality and justice, and confronting the dark legacies of our past. May we strive to build a society that stands united against racial oppression, ensuring that the events of November 10, 1898, never fade into oblivion and are never repeated.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings

Dark History: Unearthing the Brutality: The Tragic Murder of Emmett Till

Unexplained Deployment: US Military Troops Stationed in US Cities Raise Concerns of Martial Law